Ethiopian Airlines to Expand Service to Dublin and Los Angeles

January 19, 2015

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Good news for international travelers toEurope, California and Africa: Ethiopian Airlines has finalized preparations to commence flights to Dublin and Los Angeles starting from June 2015.

Ethiopian flights to Dublin and Los Angeles will be operated three times a week with the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. The flights will be the only direct service connecting Africa with Ireland and the West Coast of the United States. The flights will also be the only direct service between Dublin and Los Angeles.

“Our new flights connecting Addis Ababa, Dublin and Los Angeles will play a critical role in the expansion of trade and tourism investment between the fast-growing continent of Africa, the United States and Ireland,” Tewolde Gebremariam, CEO of Ethiopian Airlines Group, said in a statement. “As these flights will be the first and only direct air route linking Africa with Ireland and the West Coat of the U.S., they will bring these two seemingly distant cities much closer to Africa and will facilitate mobility and connectivity for businesses and the large African Diaspora community living in the West Coast of the United States.”

With the addition of Dublin, the airline’s 11th European city, and Los Angeles, its fourth point in the Americas, the Ethiopian Airlines international network will cover 85 destinations across five continents.

Ethiopian currently serves 83 international destinations across five continents with over 200 daily departures.

Source: Trave agent central

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Changi Airport welcomes the arrival of Ethiopian Airlines

January 8, 2014

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By Theodore Koumelis

SINGAPORE – Changi Airport Group (CAG) welcomed the arrival of Ethiopian Airlines, the latest addition to the family of airlines operating at Singapore Changi Airport. The East African carrier will operate a thrice-weekly service between Singapore and the capital city of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia via Bangkok, utilising the 234-seat Boeing 767-300 aircraft in a two-class configuration.

To commemorate this new link, Ethiopia’s State Minister for Trade and Industry, Mr. Taddesse Haileand Singapore’s Senior Minister of State for Trade and Industry and National Development, Mr. Lee Yi Shyan, were on board the inaugural flight that landed at Changi yesterday at 1811 hours. They were accompanied by the Chief Executive Officer for Ethiopian Airlines, Mr. Tewolde Gebremariam, among other senior government showing strong support for bilateral Ethiopia-Singapore ties, the Ambassador of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to Singapore, His Excellency Seyoum Mesfin, was also present to welcome Ethiopian’s first flight to Singapore.

The emerging African market Singapore shares strong economic ties with Africa. The African continent’s accelerated growth in recent years has stimulated domestic consumption, making it one of the world’s fastest growing regions. Trade flows between Singapore and Africa has flourished at a compounded annual growth rate of 20% since 2009, and registered S$13.8 billion in value last year.

Singapore is also Africa’s largest ASEAN investor, with significant investments in the sectors of consumer products, water preservation and construction. Similarly, African companies have been progressively using Singapore as a springboard to venture into the
burgeoning Asia-Pacific region.

In terms of passenger movements, point-to-point traffic between Africa and Southeast Asia has grown steadily over the past five years. More than 1.08 million passengers travelled between these two regions in the 12 months ending September 2013, an increase of about 45% from the corresponding period five years ago.

CAG’s Executive Vice President for Air Hub & Development, Mr. Yam Kum Weng, said, “We are proud to welcome one of Africa’s fastest growing and most reputable airlines to Changi Airport. Ethiopia is one of Africa’s largest economies, with its GDP growing faster than the rest of the continent. More significantly, the cooperation between Ethiopian Airlines and Singapore Airlines not only connects Singapore with Ethiopia but also on a broader scale, Southeast Asia, Southwest Pacific with the entire Eastern and Central Africa region. This cooperation will further strengthen Singapore’s air hub position.”

Mr. Tewolde Gebremariam, CEO of Ethiopian Airlines, said, “Singapore’s strength and competitiveness as a well-connected aviation hub is the primary reason behind our decision to utilize Singapore as the gateway to Southeast Asia and the Southwest Pacific. Code share agreements with Star Alliance partners such as Singapore Airlines will offer Ethiopian Airlines the opportunity to extend our network to Australia. This new connection will contribute to the strengthening of trade, investment and tourism ties between a booming Ethiopia and a highly developed, innovative and business-friendly Singapore.”

Addis Ababa is a new city link for Changi Airport and follows the addition of Mandalay, Kalibo, Jinan and Lijiang to Changi’s network this year.

Discover the wonders of Africa

Holiday-makers in Singapore who are looking for exciting and exotic destinations can now consider exploring Ethiopia’s stunning natural landscapes and the unique cultural experiences from the birthplace of coffee. The carrier’s new Singapore service provides travelers with unparalleled access to explore more points in the African continent such as Nairobi, Lagos, Accra, Luanda and Dar es Salaam.

With an end-of-day departure out of Singapore and Addis Ababa, Ethiopian’s flight schedule is also specially timed to meet business travel needs. Business travelers will appreciate the early morning arrival into Addis Ababa to connect to 50 major cities in the airline’s dense intra-Africa network.

 


Dreamliner fire closed London Heathrow Airport

July 12, 2013

EAL

Ethiopian Airlines issues a statement about their B787 incident at London Heathrow Airport: Today on Friday, 12 July 2013, smoke was detected from Ethiopian Airlines B787 aircraft with registration number ET-AOP, which was parked at London Heathrow airport for more than eight hours.

The aircraft was empty when the incident was observed.

The cause of the incident is under investigation by all concerned.

Further statement will be issued in due course, as we receive more information.

London’s Heathrow airport closed to flights following a fire involving a Boeing Co. (BA) 787 jet operated by Ethiopian Airlines Enterprise, while a second Dreamliner was forced to abandon a trip with technical issues. Shares of the U.S. planemaker had their biggest drop in almost two years.

The aircraft, Boeing’s newest model and beset by battery-related fire incidents that grounded the global fleet earlier this year, was sprayed with fire-retardant foam after the Heathrow event. No one was on board and there were no injuries.

Takeoffs and landings were suspended at Europe’s busiest hub for about an hour while emergency services attended the jet, before flights resumed later with significant delays. The cause of the fire is unknown, Heathrow Ltd. (FER) said on its Twitter feed, with television pictures appearing to show damage on the rear upper fuselage close to the aircraft’s tail.

“We’re aware of the 787 event at Heathrow airport and have Boeing personnel there,” the Chicago-based company said via Twitter, adding that it had sent people to the scene. “We’re working to fully understand and address this.”

Ethiopian Air said the aircraft had been parked at Heathrow for more than eight hours before smoke was detected. “The cause of the incident is under investigation by all concerned,” Henok Teferra, a spokesman for the carrier, said in a text message.


What do you hate most about eating on planes?

June 27, 2013

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What do you hate most about eating on planes? Is it the soggy sandwiches? The murky liquid that masquerades as coffee?

Or maybe just trying to meet the logistical challenge of eating from a crammed tray without knocking over your drink or flinging your cutlery onto the floor? In a survey in the US, the quality of food ranked surprisingly low among complaints about airline food. The YouGov survey of 1000 travelers found only seven percent buy a meal onboard when travelling on a non-catered airline, but poor-quality food was not the issue.

Limited food options ranked much higher on the complaint scale, along with the cost of what was on offer. Smaller numbers complained that the portion sizes on planes were too small or that there was a lack of healthy options. Personally, I think the worst aspect of airline food, particularly on long international journeys, is the repetition.

The same old salad with strange smoked meat in the corner, the same bread roll, cheese, crackers and chocolate mousse surrounding … oh joy… chicken and rice again.

If it’s not chicken and rice, it’s beef and rice. The food up the front is much more interesting, but less than 20 per cent of passengers are eating that – and even business class passengers get chicken and rice. Having had that rant, I do think we can be rather fussy when it comes to airline food, especially when we’re flying to the other side of the world for under $1500 return.

We love to complain about what we’re served and post dodgy pictures on social media but the logistics of serving hot food to hundreds of passengers, sometimes many hours after take-off, are considerable. And we’ve all seen passengers imbibe their plane fare in ‘free’ alcohol, just because they can.

The editor of airline review website Airreview.com, Jules Lorkin, says catering is a real headache for airlines, as it is expensive to produce, adds weight on aircraft and generates the most complaints. “If you ask passengers who don’t fly regularly how their flight was, the thing that sticks most in minds is often the inflight food,” he says.

Adding to the challenges of serving food at altitude are the complications of serving dozens of different types of meal on one flight, to cover religious beliefs, medical conditions, health fads and general fussiness. Singapore Airlines, for example, now offers more than 30 special meal options; a list that makes fascinating reading.

There are six different types of vegetarian meal – who knew vegies were so complicated? – along with meals that are low fat, low fibre, low lactose, low salt or low calorie.

If you’re anti-carbohydrates, they’ve got you covered. And if you get an ulcer from trying to work out what sort of meal you need, they can handle that too. Cathay Pacific revealed recently it is now serving more than 1.7 million special meals a year. Demand for healthier meals is the biggest factor, with low calorie, low cholesterol and low salt meals in hot demand.

Gluten intolerance is also on the rise, with gluten-free meal requests jumping more than 100 per cent in four years. It’s certainly gotten more complicated, but has there been any improvement in the fare?

In the US study, which only related to short flights, 27 per cent thought airline food had decreased in quality over the past couple of years, while 20 per cent believed it was unchanged and a positive-thinking seven per cent said it had improved. Jules Lorkin believes the most noticeable change is that quantity has been reduced in a bid for better quality.

Airlines that used to serve up full meal trays are now dishing up smaller portions, perhaps with the entrée and dessert cut back but a better hot dish.

Lorkin believes airlines have split into two camps: those that use their food as a sales tactic and those that see it as a necessary evil and constantly chip away at the costs.

“Those carriers which use inflight meals for sales certainly ramp up the celebrity chef element and promise that dining at 30,000 feet will ‘never look so good’,” he says.

“However, it is hard to believe that celebrity chefs like Luke Mangan, Heston Blumenthal or Neil Perry have seen what our meal trays actually look like down the back of the plane.”

Best of a bad lot?

It’s hard not to eat out of boredom when you’re strapped into a seat, so nutritionist Zoe Bingley-Pullin recommends ordering a low calorie meal. Eating high-fibre foods is the most important factor in avoiding digestive ails caused by sitting still, along with staying well hydrated, she says. Bingley-Pullin, of Nutritional Edge in Sydney, tells her clients to drink two litres of water before getting on the plane and to keep drinking (water, that is) throughout the flight.

Source: smh.com.au

Ethiopian Airlines Awarded Best Airline Staff Service in Africa

June 20, 2013

EAL

The 2013 World Airline Awards were announced at the Paris Air Show yesterday and  Ethiopian Airlines (Ethiopian), the fastest growing airline in Africa, was  awarded as the Best Airline Staff Service in Africa.

The World Airline  Awards are presented by Skytrax, the world’s largest airline and airport review  site. Awards are bestowed based on reviews from more than 180 million completed
customer surveys measuring passenger experiences on the ground and onboard.  Ethiopian’s outstanding customer service propelled the airline to the top of the  Africa category.

“This award is a testament to the hard work of  Ethiopian’s more than 7,000 employees,” said Tewolde Gebremariam, CEO of  Ethiopian. “We are proud that the training and development of our staff is being recognized and pledge that we will continue to provide the best possible travel experience to our customers.”

Ethiopian is currently implementing a  15-year strategic plan, Vision 2025, which emphasizes five-star service delivery, along with state-of-the-art technology and a modern fleet. The World Airline Award affirms that Ethiopian is on the right track.

About

Ethiopian Airlines Ethiopian Airlines (Ethiopian) is the fastest growing  airline in Africa. In its almost seven decades of operation, Ethiopian has  become one of the continent’s leading carriers, unrivalled in efficiency and operational success.

Ethiopian commands the lion’s share of the pan-African passenger and cargo network, operating the youngest and most modern fleet to more than 74 international destinations across five continents. The Ethiopian fleet includes ultra-modern and environmentally friendly aircraft such as the Boeing 787, Boeing 777-200LR, Boeing 777-200LR Freighter, and Bombardier  Q-400 with double cabin. In fact, Ethiopian is the first airline in Africa to  own and operate these aircraft.

Ethiopian is currently implementing a 15-year strategic plan, entitled “Vision 2025,” which will see the airline become the leading aviation group in Africa with seven business centers:
Ethiopian Domestic and Regional Airline; Ethiopian International Passenger  Airline; Ethiopian Cargo; Ethiopian MRO; Ethiopian Aviation Academy; Ethiopian In-flight Catering Services; and Ethiopian Ground Service.

Ethiopian is a multi-award-winning airline and a member of Star Alliance since 2011, registering an average growth of 25 percent in the past seven years.


Lufthansa firms up order for 100 A320 Family aircraft

June 17, 2013

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LE BOURGET, France – The Lufthansa Group has firmed up a previous Supervisory Board decision from March this year and signed for 100 A320 Family aircraft (35 A320neo, 35 A321neo and 30 A320ceo with Sharklets) at the Paris International Airshow in Le Bourget, France.

The Lufthansa Group has been operating the A320 Family since October 1989. They were the launching customer for the A321 and belonged to the first operators of the A319 and A320. The new order confirms Lufthansa’s leading position as the largest Airbus airline customer and operator in Europe, increasing its order for the A320 type to 299. Over 150 of these aircraft have already been delivered.

“These modern and fuel-efficient aircraft will meet the future growth and fleet renewal needs of the Lufthansa Group airlines. By purchasing these aircraft, we will be able in the long term to offer customers a comfortable and modern product in the highly competitive environment. In addition, these aircraft are contributing significantly to reduce noise and emissions wherever we fly our aircraft to”, said Nico Buchholz, Executive Vice President, Lufthansa Group Fleet Management.

“Lufthansa is a loyal customer, and has been operating our aircraft for almost 40 years. We are extremely pleased to receive this repeat order and thank our prestigious customer for their continuing strong commitment to our eco-efficient products. The A320 Family represents the highest level of operational performance while also offering Lufthansa passengers superior level of comfort and services,” said John Leahy, Airbus Chief Operating Officer, Customers.


Holiday travel safety tips for Memorial Day Weekend

May 22, 2013

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WASHINGTON, D.C. – As tens of millions of Americans prepare to travel this Memorial Day Weekend, the International Bridge, Tunnel and Turnpike Association (IBTTA), the worldwide association representing toll facility owners and operators and the businesses that serve them, offers holiday travel safety tips while traveling on America’s roadways, bridges and tunnels.

“For anyone who will be traveling this busy holiday weekend, safety has to be the number one priority,” said Patrick D. Jones, IBTTA Executive Director and CEO, who recorded a Memorial Weekend video message for travelers. “From driving safely to choosing the most effective and safest routes, drivers should plan ahead. We hope our safety tips help better prepare Americans to have a safe and fun holiday weekend.”

MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY TRAVEL SAFETY TIPS

Be prepared for a safe drive: Prevent a breakdown by making sure your car is in top working order. Check your tire pressure, and fill your tank before you head out on the highway.

Watch out for the other driver: Defensive driving is all about situational awareness. Pay attention to everything on the road. If you see another driver make a mistake, be ready to get out of the way and prevent an accident.

Choose the safer road: Toll roads are among the safest roads in America. Toll authorities know their customers expect a higher maintenance standard, and tolls give them the funds to deliver on that promise. Toll roads have safety cameras and teams that constantly monitor the roadway to respond quickly to any accident.

Choose the more direct, less congested route: Today’s electronic toll collection systems allow you to pay for your ride without slowing down or waiting in line. With All Electronic Toll collection (AET), stopping at a toll booth is a thing of the past – it’s now go, go, go.

Know the upcoming weather forecast: With so much severe weather developing across the country, know the expected weather in the locations you are traveling this holiday weekend so you can be better prepared for the best and safest routes.


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